The Cloud by Hannah Cumming

20130326-120144.jpg

The Cloud was Hannah Cumming’s debut picture book in 2010. It’s a stunner and she has since released The Lost Stars and The Red Boat. Seek them out, for I am sure they will please you greatly!

The Cloud sees a happy group of children all enjoying their art class. All, that is, except one little girl who sits by herself, draws nothing and seems to have a cloud above her head.
A classmate wants to be friends and heads over for a chat.

20130326-120334.jpg

When that doesn’t work she tries to build a friendship through drawing together. Creativity and persistence win and soon the girls are both smiling and the whole class is drawing together.

This is a smart book about the power of creativity and friendship, great for children learning about feelings and supporting others.

There are loads of nice touches to this book. At the start the room is dull and grey with clouds and rain at the window. As we progress through and the children become happy inside, the rain clears and the weather and light in the room reflects the children’s emotions. The use of the cloud is wonderful and children will love to point out and talk about all the split drawings in the book. I am particularly fond of the EleBee.

20130326-120451.jpg

I love the children’s creative freedom. In their art class they are allowed to splodge paint about, stomp in it, roll it, explore it. They are seemingly left to their own devices to explore and create. How very refreshing. It’s lovely to find a book showing children enjoying art and celebrating the healing power of creativity.

A special hurrah for the inclusiveness of the book. The illustrations show boys and girls of various nationalities, as well as showing a child using a mobility aid. The joy is that these are all incidental images, they are just there in the story blending in rather than being pointed out as if ticking a box for diversity. Well done, Hannah! A joy to read and explore together and a wonderful resource for helping children learn the importance of creativity and friendship.

Published by Child’sPlay in 2010.
Source: Our bookshelves.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: